( ISSN 2277 - 9809 (online) ISSN 2348 - 9359 (Print) ) New DOI : 10.32804/IRJMSH

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PROFESSIONAL ETHICS AMONG MEDICAL STUDENTS

    2 Author(s):  DR. (MRS) UMME KULSUM, DR.GURURAJA C.S

Vol -  10, Issue- 3 ,         Page(s) : 41 - 48  (2019 ) DOI : https://doi.org/10.32804/IRJMSH

Abstract

There are various sources of conceptions that might inform the Professional ethics in Medical students. These include the law, the constitutional principles of liberal democratic societies, an ethic of care, or various postmodern and critical theories. Yet there are ethical conceptions internal to the Medical profession, which would presumably define the core of the Medical ethics. There are eight medical ethics that are internal to develop in Medical students and central to the present topic. These are: (1) the integrity of medicos in their profession; (2) compassion; (3) responsiveness to the needs of the patients; (4) accountability to patients; (5) commitment to excellence and on-going professional development; (6) partnership with member of health care group; (7) commitment to Medico-ethical principles; and (8) confidentiality of patients’ information. These ideas provide a core of coherence for an otherwise messy domain of Medical ethics. The medical college students are accountable to the community at large. In this context, and when the welfare and medical college students of young people are at stake, uncertainty in professional conduct and the actions of Medical students becomes unacceptable. From the analysis of data it was revealed that boys and girls from rural and urban areas drawn from government and private medical colleges from Bangalore differ significantly in the all eight dimensions of medical ethics studied in the context of the present study.

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